Tag Archives: buenos aires

Selling your USA regestered vehicle in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

A step by step guide to selling your USA registered vehicle in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

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Everybody’s situation for selling a USA registered vehicle in Argentina may be different, depending on a variety of circumstances. In my specific situation: I drove my 2001 Toyota Tacoma to Argentina from the USA, then I sold my vehicle in Buenos Aires to another traveler from Germany and his girlfriend from the USA. Given these circumstances, from what I researched, this was the only way I was able to transfer my paperwork to someone else’s name. Most of this information is courtesy of Dan, from The Road Chose Me. It was posted on Wikioverland in the Argentina section. Wikioverland has been a great information source regarding Pan-Am travel, crossing the borders, etc. I highly recommend it. The entire selling process was relatively painless and stress free. The most difficult part travelers might face will be to actually find a buyer. I posted the truck for sale several months in advance on a variety of online resources, including: Craigslist (I got the most action on craigslist), Facebook travel groups, Expedition Portal, and my personal blog (Sardinetaco).

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The customs woman was freindly and extremely helpful.

 

1. Go to a Public Notary (Escribano Publico) and have a Power of Attorney (Poder) made authorizing the buyer to drive the vehicle in Argentina and all countries for an unlimited time period. (I found an English speaking notary where I got the power of attorney, They charged me $300 USD, Kier Joffe)

2. Go to a customs office (Google Map for downtown Buenos Aires) to cancel the current temporary import papers and have new ones made in the name of the new owner. This cost nothing.

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The customs office.

 

3. The new owner can now drive the vehicle in Argentina for as long as the temporary import papers allow. They can also leave and re-enter as many times as they like to get new papers, and they can drive to any other country they wish. The original owner can now legally exit Argentina. (Although, from what I concluded, there is no information in my passport that says I entered with a vehicle. I think I could have left the country via airplane without any of this new paperwork.)

4. For more info on selling your vehicle in Argentina, please visit Wikioverland Argentina.

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The deal is done!

 

Using this method was fairly easy, but you must remember, your vehicle is not officially sold, and you are really just giving somebody else permission, for an unlimited time, to travel with the vehicle. There is still a chance you could be held responsible (as the owner) if your vehicle is involved in criminal activity, vehicular homicide, etc. Let’s hope that doesn’t happen. I am not very comfortable with my name still attached to the vehicle, but my only other option was to ship the vehicle back to the USA, and that was out of the budget. The new drivers of the vehicle and I made a written and verbal agreement, to work together once they were in a position to sell the vehicle, including, possibly shipping it back to the states (or doing whatever means necessary to remove both our names from the vehicles history.) I put a certain amount of trust in the new drivers that these things will be considered when they are ready to end their trip and sell the vehicle. I think it’s important, if you use this method, to trust the people you are dealing with (for obvious reasons). To some this may sound like a risky deal, but then again this was a risky trip. If your not a risk taker you probably won’t go on a trip like this to begin with. The entire trip was an amazing adventure and we have no regrets with anything we have done regarding the trip, except eating the airline food on the plane ride home, yikes!…

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This was the last time I saw the Taco in person… Sigh…

 

The Waters of Unknown Emotion

Unknown

G’mork:  Foolish boy. Don’t you know anything about Fantasia? It’s the world of human fantasy. Every part, every creature of it, is a piece of the dreams and hopes of mankind. Therefore, it has no boundaries.

Atreyu: But why is Fantasia dying, then?

G’mork: Because people have begun to lose their hopes and forget their dreams. So the Nothing grows stronger.

Atreyu: What is the Nothing?

G’mork: It’s the emptiness that’s left. It’s like a despair, destroying this world. And I have been trying to help it.

Atreyu: But why?

G’mork: Because people who have no hopes are easy to control; and whoever has the control… has the power!

…looking at the blog, reading posts from way back in the beginning, recalling people and memories that had slipped to the back of my mind…

I am in a daze flipping through pictures, in an attempt to reconnect with those moments “on the road.”

People ask, “Are you sad that it is over?”

“I don’t know.”

Sad feels too committed. I would rather wade in the Waters of Unknown Emotion: slightly dangerous, but equally exciting. The Waters of Unknown Emotion- It is like a land you would find in “The NeverEnding Story”, next to the Swamps of Sadness. The Swamps of Sadness– no way, not going there.  That is where the horse died: it just got sucked in and was never to be seen again. Perhaps you will find me basking on the Beach of Nostalgia, the swamp is behind me but the sound of ocean waves is nearby. I am just laying out, soaking in the rays of places and people past, feeling their warmth engulf my body as the sunshine penetrates my skin. My golden tan will hold me over as I envision the frigid winter weather that lay ahead (I am going to be digging myself out of emotional snow banks this winter). Come on, I must defend against the Nothing. Oh, and don’t forget my luckdragon…Lupe.  A fictitious flying dragon with a wingless elongated body, possessing neither magical talent nor immense physical strength, but distinctive in its unfailing serendipity” (www.wordnik.com). Yup. Right on.

Falcor (the luck dragon): Having a luck dragon with you is the only way to go on a quest. 

Not a child of the 80’s? Confused about the NeverEnding Story references?  Watch this: Neverending story trailor

Cold is okay, though. I will adapt, I always do. Shoveling is good exercise.

I try not to make situations too loaded. I do not want to invest too much emotion into an “end” because then it is just that: an end. From the get go, I had a strong desire to view this “trip”, “journey” (or insert your favorite related word) as a continuation of my life. I struggled to feel settled with this idea of “getting away” and then “returning” and was resistant to identify with concepts such as wanderlust, or any other romanticized notion that communicates a sense of escape, dreaming, and my personal favorite, “head in the clouds”. As G’mork stated, “Fantasia has no boundaries.” It is alive in all of us (all the time), but sometimes we need to go a quest to experience it’s true strength. And upon return, we are inspired, invigorated, grateful.

Besides, I identify more with the image of my head hovering above the water’s surface as my legs kick to keep me afloat- sometimes it is relaxing, sometimes it is exhausting. You have to find your rhythm. Although if you hand me some kid of floating device- I am golden. I could float around forever.

 The Childlike Empress: Bastian. Why don’t you do what you dream, Bastian?

Bastian: But I can’t, I have to keep my feet on the ground!

The Childlike Empress: Call my name. Bastian, please! Save us!

Bastian: All right! I’ll do it! I’ll save you! I will do what I dream!

Can’t it all be a continuum? All experiences will be gently protected under the umbrella of life, as opposed to this concept of leaving reality and then having to “go back” (wait for sound of heavy sighs).  In reality, when we refer to reality, or the return to “the real world”, are we not just referencing the concept of responsibility? People have strong opinions regarding the topic of responsibility. I think I may be considered irresponsible for even introducing the topic.

Bastian’s father: I got a call from your math teacher, yesterday. She says that you were drawing horses in your math book. 

Bastian: Unicorns. They were unicorns.

Bastian’s Father: What?

Bastian: Nothing? 

I feel your pain, Bastian.

I still don’t know. Can it be a continuum? Will it be a continuum? Or am I just over analyzing all of this? Most likely the latter. I am going with the Einstein quote these days, “Life is like a bicycle. To keep your balance, you must keep moving.”  He was a smart guy.

We are on week 6 in Buenos Aires. The reality of returning to a different way of life (that is how i am framing it today- “a different way of life”) has started to reveal itself.  Already I find myself zoning out to CSI, and giddy with excitement about watching Girls (a series I had never seen due to our absence of cable.) Wow, we have HBO! Slowly I plug back in, and part of me hates another part of me for finding comfort in David Caruso’s face, and excitement from Lena Dunham’s escapades.

I am nostalgic for those slow, hot days in Central America when all I had was a papaya and a book. Conversations of “remember that?”, pervade the daily chatter.

As with all losses, there is that transitional space where you have to organize the experience.  You need to find a shelf for the books, a box for your letters, a closet for the clothes. The idea of everything being scattered on the floor can be unsettling (as I sit in this rental apartment with my belongings strewn about). It’s a heaping pile of mess and there is nowhere to put all your crap. And in the end you have to accept it (the mess), or be riddled with anxiety. I have a feeling all my crap from the last 15 months will lay out for a while. I have not developed a storage system for an experience such as this. It is new. And with that comes opportunity, perhaps even the possibility of invention!

The book shopkeeper, Mr Coriander- one of the only people to have been to Fantasia and returned, explains:

Bastian: What’s that book about?

Mr. Koreander: Oh, this is something special.

Bastian: Well, what is it?

Mr. Koreander: Look, your books are safe. While you’re reading them you get to become Tarzan or Robinson Crusoe

Bastian: But that’s what I like about ’em.

Mr. Koreander: Ahh, but afterwards you get to be a little boy again.

Bastian: What do you mean?

Mr. Koreander: Listen. Have you ever been Captain Nemo, trapped inside your submarine, while the giant squid is attacking you?

Bastian: Yes.

Mr. Koreander: Weren’t you afraid you couldn’t escape?

Bastian: But it’s only a story.

The sadness, reality that things will be different, hovers and you just leave it there… hovering… until that moment when it kicks in…”things will be different.” Ah-Ha!

Things will be different. I can handle that.

But at the same time, a part of you knows that things will be exactly the same. Ugh (heavy sigh).

And the cycle continues.

So, How long till we get out, again?

“Human  passions have mysterious ways, in children as well as grown-ups. Those affected by them can’t explain them, and those who haven’t known them have no understanding of them at all. Some people risk their lives to conquer a mountain peak. No one, not even they themselves, can really explain why. Others ruin themselves trying to win the heart of a certain person who wants nothing to do with them. Still others are destroyed by their devotion to the pleasures of the table. Some are so bent on winning a game of chance that they lose everything they own, and some sacrifice every thing for a dream that can never come true. Some think their only hope of happiness lies in being somewhere else, and spend their whole lives traveling from place to place. And some find no rest until they have become powerful. In short, there are as many different passions as there are people.”

Prologue (The NeverEnding Story)

 

Works Cited 

“Luck dragon”. Wordnik.com. 2014. http://www.wordnik.com/words/luckdragon (10 December 2014).

The Never-ending Story, Dir. Wolfgang Peterson. Perf. Noah Hathaway, Barret Oliver, Tami Stronach. Neue Constantin Film, Bavaria Studios (in collaboration with); Westdeutscher Rundfunk.  1984.

“Never-Ending Story Clip- Gmork Scene”. Online Posting. YouTube,10 December 2014. Web. July 25 2007.

Bonsai Asado

We were lucky to be guests to an asado (Argentine BBQ & national dish) being hosted by our friend Jorge, one of South America’s top bonsai masters. Jorge’s garden is like a bonsai forest, with a number of pint sized trees that will consume whoever enters. He walked us through the forest and showed us some prize winning bonsais, along with a bonsai he planted from a seed as a child.

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We met Alan (Jorge’s son) back in the states when he was traveling. Now that we are in Buenos Aires he invited us to his family home for the asado. The asado included various cuts of meat, both beef and pork, as well as blood sausage, chorizo and plenty of bread and wine. We stumbled out their door as full as can be.

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Be careful not to step on Penelope when roaming the garden. She may be a tortoise over 40 years old, but she deserves respect.

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Photos of the Buenos Aires Streets

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Wandering aimlessly around Buenos Aires you might come across a nicknack strewn mercado, Che Guevara merch, doll heads, and old buildings plastered with graffiti. When you want to take a break from that, there are plenty of museums to peep, or just enter one of the several salami shops and gaze at the selection. Theres nothing like relaxing in a grassy well manicured park, cutting up salami and bread after a day of street walking.

The Unkempt Tombs of Recoleta Cemetery

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Poking your head inside dilapidated mausoleums, one cannot help to be somewhat overwhelmed by the haunting presence and cryptic smells of expired Argentinian citizens. Although most of the tombs are well maintained, there are still a large amount that prove to be dilapidated and unmaintained for several years past. Broken windows and doors, spiderwebs painting the innards of the walls, and weeds growing between the caskets. “Beauty from neglect” might be a phrase that comes to mind when describing some of these tombs.

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Recoleta Cemetery, hailed one of the worlds greatest cemeteries (voted by the BBC), is the resting place to several notable people. Past Argentinian presidents, Nobel Prize winners, Eva Peron, the founder of the Argentinian Navy, and the granddaughter of Napoleon just to name a few. With close to 5000 mausoleums closely knit within the grounds, you can spend hours walking the narrow alleys getting lost and peeking in both the ramshackle as well as the well kept structures. To my surprise several of the tombs contained a staircase heading underground into the dark bowels of the earth, most likely containing one to several caskets, and possibly entire families.

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